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Marquette Messenger

The news site of Marquette High School

Marquette Messenger

The news site of Marquette High School

Marquette Messenger

Lauren Steidtmann, sophomore, is an only child but thinks  birth order influences how children grow up. “I think that birth order definitely changes the expectations that parents put on you and how you’re expected to perform, both in school and in other responsibilities,” Steidtmann said.
What Does Birth Order Say About You?
Samantha Perz, Staff Reporter • May 23, 2024

As an only child, Lauren Steidtmann, sophomore, grew up around adults instead of kids. “I always talked to adults, so I was always really...

Luis Miranda Hernandez, freshman, works on an assignment in his Spanish 2 class. Miranda Hernandez speaks Spanish at home and plans to take Heritage Spanish next year.
Heritage Spanish Classes to be Added Next Year
Luke Graves, Business Manager • May 22, 2024

Next year, Spanish Heritage classes will be offered for the first time. The classes will have two levels and will involve students who grew up...

Equine Assisted Therapy involves the use of horses to develop cognitive skills, empathy, and teamwork to name a few. Equine therapy is suitable for all demographics.
Equine Therapy Offers Alternative to Traditional Therapy
Tessa Autery, Staff Reporter • May 22, 2024

Cassidy Kerber, freshman, has lived at a barn for her entire life. She spends her days in the stables riding, walking and grazing horses. “Whenever...

Cristal Strate, FBLA sponsor, announces the club members who will be going to nationals for the Prepared Project competition. Freshmen Miridul Soupramanien, Harshith Akurati and Vibhav Chinta competed in the Intros to Programming project.
FBLA Students Go to Nationals
Justin Small, In-Depth Editor • May 10, 2024

Several students in Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) will travel to Nationals in Orlando, Florida, on Friday, June 28, as part of the...

Beyond Limits

Honoring Women’s Voices

To honor, celebrate and remind everyone of the achievements of women throughout the years in our culture and society, March is recognized as “Women’s History Month.” 

Ashley Eshelman, senior, talks about how a lot of times in our society, women are underestimated. 

“In the past, a lot of achievements were neglected. Males often took credit for the work of women, so it is great that this month shines a light on female achievements throughout history and society that haven’t always been acknowledged.” Eshelman said.

After high school, Eshelman plans to pursue a career in the STEM field. While she is excited and ready for the challenge, she does think about how her environment may be considering historically it has been more of a male-dominated field.

“I wouldn’t say it scares me just because I know what I’m capable of and I’m not going to let other people convince me otherwise,” Eshelman said. “But it is something to consider and something to think about.”

In the past, a lot of achievements were neglected. Males often took credit for the work of women, so it is great that this month shines a light on female achievements throughout history and society that haven’t always been acknowledged.

— Ashley Eshelman

Ashley Hobbs, Psychology teacher, said it’s important to highlight the achievements of women. 

“With Caitlin Clark being the all-time leading scorer in college basketball, I love seeing so many little girls being inspired by women like her,” Hobbs said. “And, it’s great to see how much recognition girl’s basketball is starting to get as a result of that. It’s a perfect example of why highlighting women’s achievements can be beneficial.”

A notable experience for Hobbs was when she heard Ruth Bader Ginsburg as the keynote speaker for a National Social Studies conference. 

“I just remember being really inspired by what she said and about how the adversity that she faced as a woman didn’t change what her goals were but helped to inspire her in continuing to reach for those goals,” Hobbs said. “Looking at the impact that a woman could have in a male-dominated field is so cool.” 

Apart from being a teacher, Hobbs helps run a family business where she’s experienced gender stereotypes. 

“People would walk right past me and walk to my husband and ask him if he was the owner, or if he was in charge of making decisions,” Hobbs said. “I don’t think people mean to be hurtful, but they have personal biases that are still influencing the assumptions they’re making about people like I couldn’t possibly be the owner because I’m a female.”

People would walk right past me and walk to my husband and ask him if he was the owner, or if he was in charge of making decisions, I don’t think people mean to be hurtful, but they have personal biases that are still influencing the assumptions they’re making about people like I couldn’t possibly be the owner because I’m a female.

— Ashley Hobbs

She finds herself in situations like these on a day-to-day basis.  

“I still get asked questions like, ‘Why are you mowing the lawn?’ I love mowing the lawn. It’s loud, so no one can talk to me. I can put in my earbuds, listen to a podcast and get a good sweat in the summer. Like, why wouldn’t I be mowing the lawn?” Hobbs said. “I can recognize those as biases, but in little kids, it’s harder to see that and then we tell little girls what they should or shouldn’t be doing based on their gender. And that’s just something societal that I think we could do better about.”

Senior Principal Amy Sturges sees Women’s History Month as a way to highlight how at one point in time women didn’t have the same rights as men did and how things have changed since then.

“Some of my friends who are females who are in very higher up leadership positions have told me experiences where some of the men just refuse to acknowledge that she is higher up than they are and that kind of thing,” Sturges said. 

In light of problems that women are faced with, Sturges emphasizes the lesson that her mom has always preached to her about, “Don’t ever let somebody say you can’t or you are not able to like you keep going on what you want.”

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About the Contributor
Prashu Sidella
Prashu Sidella, Online Editor
Prashu Sidella, senior, is the Online Editor for the Marquette Messenger. This will be her third year on staff. She is the president of Key Club, plays tennis, and dances. In her free time, she enjoys watching new shows and traveling.
Donate to Marquette Messenger
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