Equal Rights, Equal Fights

In+a+2016+survey+conducted+by+Rasmussen+Reports%2C+61+percent+of+male+voters+are+in+favor+of+women+being+included+in+the+draft%2C+while+only+38+percent+of+women+also+agree.

Media by Jilian Bunderson

In a 2016 survey conducted by Rasmussen Reports, 61 percent of male voters are in favor of women being included in the draft, while only 38 percent of women also agree.

Starting off the new year with tweets circling raging of World War III certainly was a disturbance to American citizens.

Though many of the younger people have put it upon themselves to make light humor out of the very real situation, it brings up questions on the main punch line of the joke: the draft.

During World War ll, the Selective Service Act was set in place so men of the ages 18-25 must register for Selective Service in case of a national emergency. Among the lingering questions involving the draft there is one on whether women should be required for Selective Service as well.

The idea of women in the draft is typically a controversial topic between men and women, and as of 2020, women are still not obligated to sign up for Selective Service. Some argue Selective Service strictly aimed toward men is unconstitutional and not including women in the draft does nothing for the fight for equality between men and women.

A common rebuttal against feminists urging equality is a question: “If women want equality, then why don’t they ask to get drafted?” On the spot, a defensive girl might protest and insist that of course women believe in being drafted, but the truth says otherwise.

In a 2016 survey conducted by Rasmussen Reports, 61 percent of male voters are in favor of women being included in the draft, while only 38 percent of women also agree. 52 percent of women disagree with incorporating women into the draft, while the remaining 10 percent are undecided.

To pursue equality only when it is most convenient is not how feminism, nor any form of equal justice, should be portrayed. If women in America want to have the same opportunities as men, as they should, then women should also be prepared for the same obligations. Both men and women should be seen in the same light in their ability to defend their country in a time of need.

Six in 10 women in America identify as feminists, according to a poll conducted by the Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation.

And with the World War III memes flooding in, many are from female creators who are expressing their gratitude for not being included in the draft, posing as old-fashioned housewives. While it is all good fun, is it truly how women feel about being drafted?

In order for us as a society to progress, it is a necessity for equality to be spread throughout all occasions, be it in the military, workplace, or educational system, not just when it is fitting.

Starting off the new year with tweets circling raging of World War III certainly was a disturbance to American citizens.

Though many of the younger people have put it upon themselves to make light humor out of the very real situation, it brings up questions on the main punch line of the joke: the draft.

During World War ll, the Selective Service Act was set in place so men of the ages 18-25 must register for Selective Service in case of a national emergency. Among the lingering questions involving the draft there is one on whether women should be required for Selective Service as well.

The idea of women in the draft is typically a controversial topic between men and women, and as of 2020, women are still not obligated to sign up for Selective Service. Some argue Selective Service strictly aimed toward men is unconstitutional and not including women in the draft does nothing for the fight for equality between men and women.

Both men and women should be seen in the same light in their ability to defend their country in a time of need.”

A common rebuttal against feminists urging equality is a question: “If women want equality, then why don’t they ask to get drafted?” On the spot, a defensive girl might protest and insist that of course women believe in being drafted, but the truth says otherwise.

In a 2016 survey conducted by Rasmussen Reports, 61 percent of male voters are in favor of women being included in the draft, while only 38 percent of women also agree. 52 percent of women disagree with incorporating women into the draft, while the remaining 10 percent are undecided.

To pursue equality only when it is most convenient is not how feminism, nor any form of equal justice, should be portrayed. If women in America want to have the same opportunities as men, as they should, then women should also be prepared for the same obligations. Both men and women should be seen in the same light in their ability to defend their country in a time of need.

Six in 10 women in America identify as feminists, according to a poll conducted by the Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation.

And with the World War III memes flooding in, many are from female creators who are expressing their gratitude for not being included in the draft, posing as old-fashioned housewives. While it is all good fun, is it truly how women feel about being drafted?

In order for us as a society to progress, it is a necessity for equality to be spread throughout all occasions, be it in the military, workplace, or educational system, not just when it is fitting.