MTC‌ ‌Musical‌ ‌Rehearses‌ ‌While‌ ‌Adapting‌ ‌To‌ ‌COVID-19‌ ‌Safety‌ ‌Guidelines‌

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Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, the MHS Theater Company (MTC) continues to prepare for their musical performance, “The Theory of Relativity.”

Rebecca Blindaur, theater director, chose a show that allowed for COVID-19 safety precautions, including wearing masks and social distancing, while also providing entertainment.

“I chose this show because it is a collection of songs centering around the themes of relationships, love and the overall human experience,” Blindaur said.

She said the show consists of multiple solos and duets which limits the number of people at rehearsals. The solos will each be separately filmed then edited together to create the final production streamed from Thursday, Jan. 28 to Saturday, Jan. 30.

“We are having to think about our performance more as a movie than a live theatrical performance,” Blindaur said.  “But, I am trying to make it enjoyable and fun for the kids, even if it is different.”

While auditions are traditionally in person for theater productions, this year they were in the form of online video submissions. The auditions resulted in a cast ensemble of about 20 actors for the musical.

Sarah Henderson, junior, said she is grateful the theater company still has a chance to perform during these questionable times, even if the production is virtual.

“Nothing will be the same as performing for a live audience. A virtual musical can never beat the experience of live theatre,” Henderson said.

She said dancing with a mask is her most difficult adaptation to following the COVID-19 safety guidelines.

“Not rehearsing normally is saddening, but we are doing as much as we can with our given circumstances,” Henderson said.

She said the biggest change in the theater production this year is the absence of a live audience, which is important to her.

Adriano Robins, sophomore, said he looks forward to being a part of the cast even though the rehearsals and performances are structured differently compared to previous years.

“It’s a heartfelt musical with a lot of purpose and meaning that people will desperately need during these times,” Robins said. “I can’t wait to be a part of it.”

Robins said the online auditions helped comfort him because he was in his own home and had multiple takes before submitting his final audition. However, he said it was strange not getting the immediate reaction from the audience.

Robins said his castmates are adapting well to the safety guidelines set for activities.

“I don’t think that rehearsing has gotten hindered too much,” Robins said. “The only problem we have is that we’re crunched for time, but we’ve learned to become great at time management.”

He misses the traditional rehearsals where he could see his friends every day, so he cherishes the couple times a week he sees his castmates during in-person rehearsals. 

“That’s what theater really is: it’s performing your heart out with the people you love,” Robins said. “You can’t have one or the other. You have to have both.”